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Getting The State Assessment Out Of The Box: Part 4 – “The Classroom Based State Assessment”

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Today’s guest post is from Don Gifford. Don is the Education Program Consultant for History/Government, Social Studies, and Career Standards and Assessment Services for the Kansas State Department of Education.

(This is the final installment of a four part series. Get Part One, Part Two, and Part Three.)


Commissioner Randy Watson has approved a project to bring the History, Government, and Social Studies state assessment out of the box and to embed the state assessment into what good teachers are doing in their classrooms every day.  

This is an ambitious undertaking and a bit frightful but in the KSDE spirit of redesign and the moon shot goal of “leading the world in the success of each student,” we’re moving forward. We have already enlisted more than 30 educators to help us through this difficult work. (If you are interested in helping with this process, e-mail me.)  

We’ve been working on performance level descriptions (PLDs) which describe what a student should know and be able to do at the end of elementary, middle, and high school. We have just started to work on rigorous task rubrics for the assessment and will begin soon to write sample tasks. The goal will be to pilot the sample tasks this semester so that we will have examples, student work, and exemplars for scoring available for teachers.  

What will the assessment work?  Continue reading Getting The State Assessment Out Of The Box: Part 4 – “The Classroom Based State Assessment”

We The People of the United States, In Order to Teach on Constitution Day, Need Some Great Resources!

 

download
https://www.georgefox.edu/academics/undergrad/departments/polisci/resources/constitution-day.html

Constitution Day became a national observance in 2004, when Senator Robert Byrd lobbied for a bill designating September 17 as the day for citizens to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution and learn more about our founding document. Senator Byrd once said, “Our ideals of freedom, set forth and realized in our Constitution, are our greatest export to the world.”

He added the Constitution Day clause to his 2004 federal spending bill because he believed that all citizens should know about their rights as outlined in the Constitution. This clause mandates the teaching of the Constitution in schools that receive federal funds, as well as federal agencies.

Need some ideas? Start with these:

What are you planning on doing in your classroom for Constitution Day?  Share your resources in the comments section below!

You Sorry Sack of Slugs! I Want YOU to Think Historically

Jill Weber is a middle and high school teacher in Cheney, Kansas. Today she’s sharing about the Historical Thinking Boot Camp she takes her kids through every August.


A few years ago I completely reworked the start of my school year with my 7th grade students. I found that social studies was changing. It wasn’t just dates and facts that needed to be memorized. High level analysis and thinking were now in the picture. These are skills students don’t come in knowing how to do. They needed training.

So I developed a Historical Thinking Boot Camp for the first couple weeks in August. Primary sources, contextualize, corroboration, making a claim, detecting bias . . . these are BIG terms for the little green students I have walking in my door. The LAST thing I want to do is overwhelm them with boring vocabulary worksheets and lectures.

So instead they get this:

Curious? You can still access my original blog post about the Boot Camp.

Here’s the deal, guys and gals. This is my most requested material. I give it away for free. And this year, I will be presenting my Boot Camp at the Kansas Social Studies Conference on Sunday, October 28th. You’ll get a FRONT ROW SEAT to my latest Boot Camp updates, copies, what works, what doesn’t, examples, and the chance for some great Q & A to help you walk through it all.

All you have to do is show up. Head over to register for this year’s conference and get the early bird pricing at the conference website.

Seriously . . . showing up at the conference gets you into some MAJOR sessions including:

  • Stanford History Education Group executive director and guru Joel Breakstone sharing historical thinking and online literacy tools (The SHEG stuff is awesome and helps support a lot of my Boot Camp.)
  • Information about the 2020 social studies state assessment from KSDE consultant Don Gifford
  • #Buzzworthy classroom resources from teacher rock stars Derek Schutte and T.J. Warsnak
  • And much, MUCH, MORE! It’s the BEST money your district will spend on social studies PD all year. Get there!

(PS . . . the video is an example of me completely out of my comfort zone. I hate watching myself on tape. But I ask my students to step outside their comfort zones. Every. Single. Day. It’s only fair that I should too.)

*Look for part 2 of Don Gifford’s series on assessments on Wednesday. We thought Jill’s boot camp was too good and timely so we preempted all that assessment talk.

Good Historical Thinking Begins With The Right Question

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This week’s poster is Adam Topliff: I teach 8th Grade Social Studies & Civics at Wamego Middle School in Wamego, KS.  I love all things Hamilton!


It’s almost that time again, school is just around the corner.  Time to unpack your classrooms, create your new catchy bulletin boards and really think about lesson planning.  The unpacking and bulletin boards seems to always go quicker and with much less stress. However, the planning of how to kick off school and reflecting on the design and layout of what we explore throughout the year can sometime be a bit overwhelming.  The most important thing I think about in lesson design is not the fun activities or exploration, but the question. To create classrooms that engage in good historical thinking we have to develop the right question or questions from the very beginning.  So what are the right types of questions? Let’s explore . . . 

  • The Google Factor
    The discussion about questions that kids can Google the answer is not something new.  So this is a just a short reminder, don’t create questions for your kids to investigate that can be Googled and answered in just a couple of minutes.  Check out Glenn Wiebe’s post on his History Tech Blog that sheds more light in creating the UnGoogleable question. “If they can Google it, why do they need you?”
  • The C3 Inquiry
    If you have never spent some time investigating the C3 Framework and its Inquiry Arc you need to get over there.  Developed by NCSS to assist states in creating curriculum, the C3 Inquiry Arc begins first with developing solid inquiry based questions.

Inquiry Arc Format

 

In developing questions the Inquiry Arc asks that you have questions that will compel students to use multiple Social Studies disciplines and use evidence/sources in drawing a conclusion.  So when you think about your question, do they require your kids to do this?

  • Don’t Reinvent The Wheel
    Good news – if you are struggling to figure out what to ask, there are great resources that have pre-created inquiry based questions.  The New York State Social Studies K-12 Resource Kit provides a great site that you can search by grade level and topics. Once you find a an inquiry that might fit what you are looking for, you can quickly download the entire Inquiry Arc with all the compelling questions and formative type of activities that can be used in class. NYC Inquiries You also can create an account and create your own inquiries using their resources and push it out digitally to your students.  

Gilder Lehrman has a amazing list of inquiry based questions that are listed in chronological order and allow for great historical investigation and discussion – “Essential Questions in Teaching American History”

So as you kick off the school year and begin unpacking your lesson plans don’t forget to start with just the right question.

NCSS President’s Farewell

Below you will find the farewell from the outgoing President of our national organization, Terry Cherry.


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June 30, will end my term as President of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).  The time I spent as President has been a roller coaster ride, with highs, lows, twists, and loops. As the ride ends, I am glad I went on it and would do it over again if I could.

NCSS is approaching its 100th anniversary, which will be celebrated in 2020.  That year our country will also elect a president, participate in the summer Olympics in Japan, celebrate the centennial of the 19th Amendment, and certainty witness other major events.

To prepare for NCSS’ second hundred years, I have been explaining to members that it is time for some changes.  We can no longer be an organization that only supports conferences and publications. Larry Paska, the NCSS Executive Director, and the NCSS staff are reaching out beyond our social studies education communities to share our message and build new partnerships.  Larry understands, as we all do, that NCSS has a message, which needs to be heard by everyone.

As we approach our centennial, NCSS needs to consider what its future vision and mission should be. Is it time for a name change?  NCSS has some international ties and those need to be expanded. This would require to use the term International. The term social studies is mostly used in the United States.  Other countries use the term social science.  There are some states that now are replacing social studies with social science.  International Council of the Social Science or something close to that needs to be our new name taking into our bicentennial.

Last September NCSS board of directors held its first-ever meeting in conjunction with a state council.  Cincinnati, Ohio hosted the Ohio Council for the Social Studies and the NCSS board met during the conference.  This allowed social science educators to meet the NCSS board members and allowed board members to participate in a state council conference.  I do hope this pattern continues of engaging NCSS board members with state council members during a state conference.

The bulk of NCSS membership is classroom teachers approximately 88%. The remaining members come from Associated Groups. This year the Board of Directors  has reached out to our Associated Groups more fully than in the recent past. They were included in our March board meeting. The Associated Groups have been given 4 positions on the Nominations and Elections Committee.  In the next few years board positions could be exclusively from members of the four groups.

Is this a positive move or not?  That is something you as a NCSS member need to consider. Representation of all NCSS members is important. A balanced representation is also important.

The future of NCSS depends on each member. You as an NCSS member are also an ambassador of our discipline.  Telling people who we are, explaining the importance of social science in the curriculum, and reminding everyone that we teach citizenship.  NCSS is working on giving you the tools to share our message. We welcome any suggestions, ideas, and methods on ways to promote your organization.

During the 2017-2018 year some accomplishments have been:  

  Hiring a Director of Marketing & Membership and a Youth Engagement Program Manager to expand our marketing and Rho Kappa programs, and re-structuring a department built on member services.

  Revising several other positions, including a Membership Program Manager, Member Engagement Program Manager, and a Meetings & Education Program Manager.

  Expanding membership options to include Online and Premium Memberships, and joint memberships with Affiliated Councils and the National Council for Geographic Education.

  Building a new Institutional Membership option for services offered to organizations, starting Summer 2018.

  Building new subscription services to promote individual benefits to the general public, starting Summer 2018.

  Launching a monthly webinar series for leadership groups to connect with each other and strengthen our internal professional learning network.

  Creating new partnerships with education associations and institutions to expand professional learning, networking, and membership options.

  Increasing the frequency of issues for The Social Studies Professional, communications with leadership groups, and social media engagement.

I ask that you welcome and support our new NCSS President beginning July 1, India Meissel. One of the best ways to support the new president and NCSS is to sign up to attend our annual National Conference in Chicago, November28-December2.  Registration is now open on the NCSS website http://www.socialstudies.org/conference.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your President. The ride is slowing down and the end is in sight.  But there are other rides to take for you and me within the NCSS. May you as an NCSS member find your special ride, use your gifts and talents as together we build NCSS into an International organization.  Together we seek ways to promote NCSS as the only organization to representing social science educators. At the end of our ride, we can say we helped the world to know the importance of social science in the lives of students and adults.

Terry Cherry

NCSS President 2017-2018