(Pull It, Twist It, Bop It) Flip It: Blended Learning in the Social Studies Classroom

The tired stereotype of the history teacher at the front of the room lecturing from bell to bell, droning on about nothing but names, places, and dates, and never noticing the kids sleeping in the back row needs to be thrown out the window!  In its place, how about a teacher that never lectures but instead provides students time to work hands on with the content and apply their learning from bell to bell?

With Flipped Learning, this is possible in every social studies classroom!

 

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https://www.slu.edu/cttl/resources/teaching-tips-and-resources/flipped-classroom-resources

Continue reading (Pull It, Twist It, Bop It) Flip It: Blended Learning in the Social Studies Classroom

Let Freedom Ring!

freeport-illinois-fireworks-2017Anyone else hear Martina McBride belting out a hit when you read that title?

For the majority of you (I hope), it is summer break and you aren’t spending too much time thinking about lesson planning. But it’s never a bad idea to have some great Independence Day lesson plans in your back pocket for a rainy day!  All of my 4th of July lesson planning came when I was running a preschool summer camp; squeeze some glue on a black piece of construction paper, throw some glitter at it, and BOOM . . . a firework!

Luckily these resources have a bit more history to them for those teachers that like to cover some actual content in their classrooms!

Don’t forget to check back later this fall for a collection of Constitution Day lesson plans and resources!

How do we help students compete in this global economy? A professional development opportunity.

Angela headThis pre-holiday week post is from Angela Howdeshell: I work as the Vice President for Programs and Administration for the Kansas Council for Economic Education, a non-profit organization housed at Wichita State University with a mission of helping Kansas K-12 schools integrate financial literacy and economic education.


How do today’s students become more competitive in this ever-changing global economy?  One of the best ways is to increase the level of understanding in regards to economic issues.  As citizens of this great Nation, we should all strive to be better consumers, producers, workers, investors, voters and all around better decision makers in everything we do.  This makes the case for economic literacy in the classroom.   Kansas and the entire Nation will gain when we increase the level of economic education in Kansas.

Many people think that economics is rather abstract and difficult to teach to our youth.  While we might be a little biased in the Council for Economic Education network of states councils, we very strongly disagree.  Economic education must have priority in our K-12 school system just like we teach math, language arts and history.  Economic education should have foundations laid as students progress in their level of understanding.  At the age of 18, students can vote but we know that many lack the most basic understanding of economics.

Economics concepts are easy to integrate across the curriculum into language arts, math, science and social studies since economics is everywhere.  While many say economics is boring, most teachers introduced to great resources are very excited to go back and teach economics in their classroom.  Economics is practical and it definitely relates to the real world.  Students will instinctively recognize the relationship when teachers bring them engaging lessons.

Schools and teachers will also find that teaching economics can also be easy on the ol’ budget.  Free educational resources and professional development opportunities are readily available in most states, including Kansas.  The Kansas Council for Economic Education (KCEE) is here to help Kansas schools.  KCEE has partnered with the Foundation for Teaching Economics to bring Kansas teachers a special one-day training:

July 25Understanding Global Economic Issues – an event offered in partnership with the Foundation for Teaching Economics for 6th-12th grade teachers incorporating global economic concepts into classes.  Focus of program is on current global economic issues with a variety of lecture/discussion sessions and case studies/simulations adapted for classroom use.

  • FREE one day professional development event
  • Location – Lake Quivira Country Club, south of the Kansas Speedway off Hwy 435
  • $50 stipend if accepted by 10th
  • Optional: One hour graduate credit in economics from the University of Colorado Colorado Springs (approximately $122).  Assignment to be given during program seminar.

Why do people trade – across city lines, state lines, or national borders?  Are we better off with or without trade?  Will trade hurt or benefit certain groups of people?  How do some nations try to distort trade patterns?

These questions and many more are incorporated into the various lecture/discussion sessions and case studies that serve as the basis for the FTE One Day seminar on Understanding Global Economic Issues.

Presented in a non-biased manner, issues that face nations throughout the world will be explored and discussed.  Case studies and simulations may be adapted to variety of classes and disciplines.

The primary economics concepts emphasized throughout the sessions will be those related to the role of trade in raising standards of living and how policies can be developed to accomplish this goal.

Sessions will focus on current global trade patterns, trade alliances, impact of changes in exchange rates, and trade-offs that occur as trade patterns change over time.

REGISTER ONLINE:  http://bit.ly/UGEIapplication Seating is limited so apply ASAP.

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KCEE also offers other ways to help schools.  Webinars will be available in August for some programs and events.    Most states have a Council affiliated with the Council for Economic Education is a non-profit education organization with a great network of state Councils.

Register online or find out more about these workshop on the KCEE website at www.kcee.wichita.edu.  Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/KCEE1959.

NCSS President’s Farewell

Below you will find the farewell from the outgoing President of our national organization, Terry Cherry.


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June 30, will end my term as President of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).  The time I spent as President has been a roller coaster ride, with highs, lows, twists, and loops. As the ride ends, I am glad I went on it and would do it over again if I could.

NCSS is approaching its 100th anniversary, which will be celebrated in 2020.  That year our country will also elect a president, participate in the summer Olympics in Japan, celebrate the centennial of the 19th Amendment, and certainty witness other major events.

To prepare for NCSS’ second hundred years, I have been explaining to members that it is time for some changes.  We can no longer be an organization that only supports conferences and publications. Larry Paska, the NCSS Executive Director, and the NCSS staff are reaching out beyond our social studies education communities to share our message and build new partnerships.  Larry understands, as we all do, that NCSS has a message, which needs to be heard by everyone.

As we approach our centennial, NCSS needs to consider what its future vision and mission should be. Is it time for a name change?  NCSS has some international ties and those need to be expanded. This would require to use the term International. The term social studies is mostly used in the United States.  Other countries use the term social science.  There are some states that now are replacing social studies with social science.  International Council of the Social Science or something close to that needs to be our new name taking into our bicentennial.

Last September NCSS board of directors held its first-ever meeting in conjunction with a state council.  Cincinnati, Ohio hosted the Ohio Council for the Social Studies and the NCSS board met during the conference.  This allowed social science educators to meet the NCSS board members and allowed board members to participate in a state council conference.  I do hope this pattern continues of engaging NCSS board members with state council members during a state conference.

The bulk of NCSS membership is classroom teachers approximately 88%. The remaining members come from Associated Groups. This year the Board of Directors  has reached out to our Associated Groups more fully than in the recent past. They were included in our March board meeting. The Associated Groups have been given 4 positions on the Nominations and Elections Committee.  In the next few years board positions could be exclusively from members of the four groups.

Is this a positive move or not?  That is something you as a NCSS member need to consider. Representation of all NCSS members is important. A balanced representation is also important.

The future of NCSS depends on each member. You as an NCSS member are also an ambassador of our discipline.  Telling people who we are, explaining the importance of social science in the curriculum, and reminding everyone that we teach citizenship.  NCSS is working on giving you the tools to share our message. We welcome any suggestions, ideas, and methods on ways to promote your organization.

During the 2017-2018 year some accomplishments have been:  

  Hiring a Director of Marketing & Membership and a Youth Engagement Program Manager to expand our marketing and Rho Kappa programs, and re-structuring a department built on member services.

  Revising several other positions, including a Membership Program Manager, Member Engagement Program Manager, and a Meetings & Education Program Manager.

  Expanding membership options to include Online and Premium Memberships, and joint memberships with Affiliated Councils and the National Council for Geographic Education.

  Building a new Institutional Membership option for services offered to organizations, starting Summer 2018.

  Building new subscription services to promote individual benefits to the general public, starting Summer 2018.

  Launching a monthly webinar series for leadership groups to connect with each other and strengthen our internal professional learning network.

  Creating new partnerships with education associations and institutions to expand professional learning, networking, and membership options.

  Increasing the frequency of issues for The Social Studies Professional, communications with leadership groups, and social media engagement.

I ask that you welcome and support our new NCSS President beginning July 1, India Meissel. One of the best ways to support the new president and NCSS is to sign up to attend our annual National Conference in Chicago, November28-December2.  Registration is now open on the NCSS website http://www.socialstudies.org/conference.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your President. The ride is slowing down and the end is in sight.  But there are other rides to take for you and me within the NCSS. May you as an NCSS member find your special ride, use your gifts and talents as together we build NCSS into an International organization.  Together we seek ways to promote NCSS as the only organization to representing social science educators. At the end of our ride, we can say we helped the world to know the importance of social science in the lives of students and adults.

Terry Cherry

NCSS President 2017-2018

So. What will you be reading this summer?

Today’s post is a cross post from Glenn Wiebe and his History Tech site. Glenn loves to read and today, he shares about his habit of creating a summer reading list.

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Long time History Tech readers already know this. Every summer, I make a list of books I plan to read between now and September. Long time History Tech readers also know this. Not once, not ever, a couple of times I came close but never ever, have I actually finished the list.

There’s always been something. I get distracted with a new book that comes out or some event happens that pulls me in a different direction. But some day . . . some day, it’s gonna happen. I’m trying to be realistic this year. Part of me says; yes, this summer it’s gonna happen – you’re going on a long anniversary trip to a tropical beach without the tech. Tons of time for book reading while sipping cool beverages under an umbrella.

The other part of me says; not a chance – as soon as you get home, the World Cup starts and the rest of June and part of July are shot to h, e, double hockey sticks. So we’ll see. (But it does help with the reading goal that the US team apparently forgot how to play the game and didn’t qualify, giving me less reason to watch. Go Iceland.)

The whole idea here got started moons ago when I first started teaching and some very smart people encouraged me to not take the summers off. They’re the perfect time for learning, they said. Read a book, they said. Maybe two or more, they said.

So I did. And they were right. We need to keep learning, keep asking questions, keep moving forward. And what better time for that than between now and September? Some summers I start with a specific theme. This year? Not so much. Just a few books that look interesting or fun to read.

Here’s the 2018 list – fingers crossed: Continue reading So. What will you be reading this summer?