All posts by Kori Green

About Kori Green

I teach 8th grade social studies at El Dorado Middle School in El Dorado, KS. I enjoy U.S. history, dabble in British history, and love incorporating technology in the classroom.

Balancing Security: Past, Present and Future

Hopefully you were able to join us at the Kansas Social Studies Conference earlier this month or were fortunate enough to get to attend National Council for the Social Studies annual conference in San Francisco just before Thanksgiving.  If you’re already looking for your next social studies fix or haven’t had the opportunity yet, might I suggest a trip to Kansas City?


Greetings, my fellow Kansans!  With any luck the year has settled in for you.  It has been a beautiful beginning, and the kids are just as wonderful as ever!  My name is Jeff Benes and I am the Past President of the Missouri Council for the Social Studies.  I live in Westwood, Kansas, but work in Gladstone, Missouri (be honest, how many of you had to Google those two locations). This school year, at the end of February, the Missouri Council is hosting our annual conference, and we wanted to reach out to you as neighbors and fellow teachers.  

National_World_War_I_Museum_-_Kansas_City,_MO_-_DSC07446The conference will be held on the Missouri side of Kansas City, at the National World War I Museum and Memorial, the weekend of February 23 and 24 (Friday and Saturday).  If you have never had a chance to visit, this is the time.  The museum itself is worth the weekend to come visit (and if you are a museum buff, you will need more than one day).  On top of that, there will be great presentations in both content and practice, incredible speakers, a great lunch, and the opportunity to network with people just like you:  Passionate teachers looking to hone their craft.   Continue reading Balancing Security: Past, Present and Future

Winning the RACE of writing

It’s been that kind of school year for all of us, so here’s a great post on writing from last October by KCSS board member Adam Topliff. Happy parent-teacher conference season everyone!

Doing Social Studies

student-at-computerStudents + writing = frustration . . . sound like familiar?

The growing expectation of integrating writing  in our Social Studies classroom makes us as anxious about the process as our students. Why does this happen? There are a variety of factors that contribute to this fear and frustration but the most common that I hear from other teachers is

I don’t have a solid system to assist my kids with writing.

We teach a topic and then assess students by asking them to write a response or reaction. What do we get back?

View original post 596 more words

Supporting New Colleagues

Whew! Kansas teachers have just about the first month of school under our belts. Heck, Homecoming is this weekend here in El Dorado. You may finally have the feeling that your feet are on solid ground, having made it through all the new faces, rosters, seating charts, data sorting, lesson planning, meet the teacher nights, etc. Of course, now we’re into our first big assignments to be graded, parent-teacher conferences are just around the corner and if you’re also coaching your away games mean at least one night a week is taken over by bus rides, encouragement and fast food. Now try to remember what it was like figuring it all out for the first time. Wow.

 

School Teacher Children Classroom Playmobil

We know that schools in Kansas haven’t exactly flourished in the past few years and that has really effected teachers. The Wichita NBC affiliate KSN ran a story that Kansas is down 1500 teachers for this school year. Is anyone surprised that our young people aren’t flocking to the profession? So I’m asking that if there are any new teachers in your building, please check in with them, even if they’re not a fellow social studies instructor (we’ll forgive them this once). Ask them if they need anything – help them navigate the teacher’s lounge, or share the trick about fixing a jam in the copier. Let them know there’s a lifeguard on duty in case they start to feel like they’re drowning.

We need to encourage and support our new colleagues so we don’t lose them; lock them in before they figure out there are actually jobs that end at 5:00 and have weekends off. In addition to personal outreach, there are a lot of good resources out there for new teachers to tap: Edutopia has a Toolkit for New Teachers, the National Education Association has a good selection of articles for new teachers on many of the issues that don’t necessarily get covered in university programs. Parent-teacher conferences are just around the corner and ASCD has a good set of guidelines to get them started.

There are also a wealth of networks new teachers can join that are on-going. You might have caught my post back in March on #sschat. They’ve seen the need and created the new hashtag #NTsschat just for New Teachers (NTs). The National Council for the Social Studies also has their Twitter account @NCSSNetwork and Facebook page and the Technology Community has the handle @TechNCSS.

In fact, @TechNCSS will be hosting a Twitter Chat of their own tomorrow (Tuesday, September 19) just for the problems faced by new teachers. Please encourage your new teachers to join us (once again, even if they’re not social studies, maybe learning about Twitter Chats will help them to find their way to one in their curriculum). You can feel free to join us if you want to help answer their questions or you’ve been interested in checking one out. This is one that will have a lot of basics if you want to lurk and pick up some new resources.

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2017 Kansas Social Studies Conference Kansans Can: Social Studies Leading the Way

ks ss conf logo

Be sure to mark your calendar and start making plans to attend the 2017 Kansas Social Studies Conference Kansans Can: Social Studies Leading the Way

Join us for a great time on November 5-6, 2017 in downtown Wichita at the historic Hotel at Old Town and Conference Center. You won’t want to miss it! Get the full details at the conference website.

The conference theme is focused on the teaching and learning of historical thinking skills and assessments with a special highlight on economics and the state board’s Kansans Can vision. You’ll walk away smarter with new details about the upcoming Spring 2018 social studies assessment, civic engagement strategies, tech integration tools, current best practice, and the latest from the Kansas Council for Economic Education.

Registration Fee:
$50 – Kansas Teachers/Administrators
$20 – Kansas Pre-service Teachers
$50 – Exhibitors

The registration fee also include hors d’oeuvres at the awards reception Sunday evening, breakfast Monday morning, and lunch Monday afternoon so don’t delay and register today!  We can send you an invoice to pay registration at a later date but reserve your hotel as soon as possible.

Extra bonus? The conference is in the center of Old Town with all sorts of fun things to do. We’ve also arranged for amazing prices at the Hotel at Old Town, a great piece of Wichita history.  Be sure to reserve your room before the October 12th cutoff date.  Don’t wait until the last minute as these rooms will go fast at this rate!  Contact the hotel directly to book your reservation. (You can request an invoice so the school can provide payment/check at check in.)

Room Rates:old hotel
Queen Studio – $79.00/night
King Studio – $89.00/night
Queen/Queen Studio – $99.00/night

Conference Schedule:

This conference will have great information for all grade levels, including special sessions for elementary teachers. Full details on the session schedule is coming in early October. (Interested in presenting?)

Sunday, November 5th:

3:00 – 6:15 p.m.
Afternoon workshops

6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Reception/awards ceremony with hors d’oeuvres and drinks

KSDE Update from Don Gifford

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7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Special screening of Dawn of Day, a historical documentary about the Underground Railroad in Kansas that brings to light Wabaunsee County’s unsung heroes who traversed one of the most turbulent times in our nation’s history. Faith, family, and politics united a community of neighbors who lived and died to ensure Kansas was a free state. Hang around after for conversation and teaching tips.

Monday November 6th

8:00 a.m.
Breakfast

Guest Speaker:  Mark Schug, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.
8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Breakout sessions

Lunch 

3:30 p.m.
Conference closing

Session Proposals:

We are currently soliciting session proposals so be sure to send us a proposal by September 20th if you have some great information to share with colleagues.  

Get more info and submit your proposal online

Your homework?

  • Save the date.
  • Talk to your admin.
  • Bookmark the website.
  • Submit a session proposal.
  • Share this information with your social studies colleagues.

Need more info? Contact:

Angela Howdeshell
Vice President for Programs & Administration
Kansas Council for Economic Education
kcee@wichita.edu
316-978-5183
www.kcee.wichita.edu

Increasing student engagement through place-based education: The Flint Hills Maps & Education program

Guest Post: This month we have a guest post from Anne Wilson, Map Program Coordinator for the Flint Hills Map and Education Program.


As teachers, we often hear students lament:  “What does this have to do with me?”  We know if our kids believe an idea actually affects them, it all of a sudden really matters.  However, actually relating learning to students’ own lives and local environment takes time and background knowledge we don’t always have.

Now a grass-roots team of teachers in the Flint Hills region has developed a new “place-based education” program – designed to connect learning to students’ own heritage, culture, landscapes, ecology, economy, and experiences as a foundation for the study of core subjects.

How important is place?  Bio-regionalist author Wendell Berry writes, “If you don’t know where you are, you don’t know who you are.” Many of our students think they’re from nowhere.  They are connected to everywhere but where they are.  This program gives them the gift of pride, understanding and commitment to their place.

The bonus is: Continue reading Increasing student engagement through place-based education: The Flint Hills Maps & Education program