Economics is for Everyone!

Angela head

This week’s post comes from Angela Howdeshell: I work as the Vice President for Programs and Administration for the Kansas Council for Economic Education, a non-profit organization housed at Wichita State University with a mission of helping Kansas K-12 schools integrate financial literacy and economic education.


Green BookEngage your students by integrating economics into your social studies classes!  Any kindergarten teacher all the way to a high school history teachers is bound to find many places were economics can easily be expanded to add great value.  The Council for Economic Education has simplified job by giving you the background and the lessons & activities.  Take a few minutes this week to start reviewing the many free online lessons and professional development opportunities that have recently been added to www.EconEdLink.org. There is something for everyone and the new website features allow you to search by grade level, topic, subject, keyword and more!   Be sure to join for free and you can save your favorites and receive updates on new opportunities for training.

Below is just a few examples of what you’ll find for pre-recorded webinars:

 

Check out the full list of upcoming webinars.

Make every Word Count! Tips for a Standout Resume from a School Administrator

02E60666-E98C-4FC2-9D19-12AB9200E874Zlatnik_Joseph_71Scott Peavey and Joe Zlatnik are both administrators in the Kansas City area.  Scott is currently the Assistant Principal and Activities Director at Basehor-Linwood Middle School.  Joe is the Assistant Principal at Eudora High School.


careerbuilder-ar_post-484As the calendar approaches spring (which is hard to believe as I sit here looking out my window at an ice storm) school districts throughout the state of Kansas are preparing for another round of hiring.  Many schools have already had multiple vacancies while the majority are now receiving letters of resignation, retirement notices, and board approval for brand new positions. Many area universities are holding their career fairs soon and hundreds of aspiring new teachers are preparing their materials to do what they can to stand out from the crowd.

Although cover letters are undoubtedly important, the reality is that most applications get vetoed before anyone even gets to reading the letter.  We are both administrators in the Kansas City metro area, and it is not uncommon for schools in this region to receive well over 100 applicants for most teaching vacancies; this is especially true for most social studies openings.  When school districts are looking through these applications a “sorting” process often takes place. Based off of an initial look of the submitted resumes a small number are chosen for closer examination; from there an even smaller number are selected for interviews.

The following are a few simple recommendations to help your resume truly reflect the aspects of your candidacy that you are hoping to convey; and hopefully get you to the next round of the process!

Continue reading Make every Word Count! Tips for a Standout Resume from a School Administrator

Building The Profession By Building Relationships With Teacher Ed Programs

adam-topliff

Adam Topliff teaches 8th Grade social studies & civics at Wamego Middle School in Wamego, KS.  And loves all things Hamilton!


 

KSU

Let’s take a field trip. I want you to travel back to your college days.  

OK . . . before we go any further, this is not traveling back to all the parts of college. There may be a few details that you would like to forget or some events that you can’t quite remember as clearly as you might hope. 

But I do want you to take a quick memory ride back to your education classes, specifically your methods of instruction class.

What do you remember from the class? What were you able to take from that class that was designed to help you prepare to go into the classroom and be the teacher you aspired to become?  I can’t speak for all the colleges but I can say I took mountain of information from my methods class at Emporia State. (Thanks Dr. Mallein!)

The thing I liked the most is that the class was truly an active lab of learning how to teach beyond just the Social Studies. This was about teaching kids.  Everything from lesson plan design, to effectively implementing small groups, was geared to see the importance of the student first, not the content. Those lessons have greatly influenced my own thinking and methods as a middle school teacher.

You may not have had a similar experience. If you didn’t, I hope you were able to connect later with others in the profession who helped you grow. And I hope that you’re now motivated to help build the profession by finding ways to support and encourage others in becoming quality social studies educators.

How can we continue to build awesome social studies teachers? Continue reading Building The Profession By Building Relationships With Teacher Ed Programs

It’s Kansas Day! It’s Kansas Day!

Today is Kansas Day. How cool is that?

If you didn’t know already, the state of Kansas is an unbelievably interesting place. And way more than just a flyover.

She was once called the Great American Desert, a title mistakenly given her by temporary passers-through. She’s always been home to huge herds of North American bison, vast expanses of seven foot tall Big Bluestem prairie grass, forested hills, hawks, bobcats, coyotes, the Arkansas and Big Blue rivers, Cottonwood trees, a ton of deer and antelope a-playing, and not just a few amazing people.

Indians. Cowboys. Explorers and Pony Express riders. Politicians. Artists. Aviators, scientists and writers. Reformers. Populists. Pizza makers. Farmers. Lots and lots of people who grow the food we eat every day.

Kansas turns 158 today. And it’s her people that make her who she is.

There was David Buffam, Continue reading It’s Kansas Day! It’s Kansas Day!