Tag Archives: Cassie Medley

Graphic Content: Using Visual Communication in the Social Studies Classroom

imgresOne of my favorite ways to present information to students is through the use of infographics because they are visually appealing and easy to read, even though they can contain a wealth of information.  In the past I have been a huge proponent of not recreating the wheel when it came to infographics because it is so easy to search for a topic and find something that has already been created and can easily be used in the classroom.  That was until I was introduced to Piktochart, the easy-to-use infographics creator. Continue reading Graphic Content: Using Visual Communication in the Social Studies Classroom

“Was Kansas Actually Bleeding?”

Bleeding Kansas

One thing I have learned as a teacher, kids really do say the darndest things!  Recently my Kansas History class started in on Bleeding Kansas, and I realized that very few of my students had retained any prior knowledge on the subject.  To get the students interested in the topic, and to provide them with some basic knowledge before we really got started on the topic, I planned a pre-reading strategy using key words from the Bleeding Kansas chapter in our Kansas Journey textbook.  Continue reading “Was Kansas Actually Bleeding?”

This Isn’t English Class (or computers for that matter)

Having just finished my first year of teaching I find myself looking back at all of this lessons I learned this year, and there were a lot, and how I can change my curriculum next year to incorporate what I have learned.  One of the most surprising things that I learned about 7th graders (at least mine) was that they have no clue how to write.

It all started with what I assumed would be an easy and straightforward assignment, write a paragraph comparing and contrasting the Aztec, Inca, and Maya civilizations.  The first response I got, “Mrs. Medley this isn’t English class.”  Of course I had to be smart and retort with “WHAT?!  They told me I was teaching English!”  After my lame joke received a few giggles I told the students that they would have to write in all of their classes eventually, so we might as well start now.  I got my first hint that they had no clue what they were doing when someone asked what compare and contrast meant, and I had to stop and think to myself “Do they really not know how to do this?”  Continue reading This Isn’t English Class (or computers for that matter)