Category Archives: Angela Howdeshell

How do we help students compete in this global economy? A professional development opportunity.

Angela headThis pre-holiday week post is from Angela Howdeshell: I work as the Vice President for Programs and Administration for the Kansas Council for Economic Education, a non-profit organization housed at Wichita State University with a mission of helping Kansas K-12 schools integrate financial literacy and economic education.


How do today’s students become more competitive in this ever-changing global economy?  One of the best ways is to increase the level of understanding in regards to economic issues.  As citizens of this great Nation, we should all strive to be better consumers, producers, workers, investors, voters and all around better decision makers in everything we do.  This makes the case for economic literacy in the classroom.   Kansas and the entire Nation will gain when we increase the level of economic education in Kansas.

Many people think that economics is rather abstract and difficult to teach to our youth.  While we might be a little biased in the Council for Economic Education network of states councils, we very strongly disagree.  Economic education must have priority in our K-12 school system just like we teach math, language arts and history.  Economic education should have foundations laid as students progress in their level of understanding.  At the age of 18, students can vote but we know that many lack the most basic understanding of economics.

Economics concepts are easy to integrate across the curriculum into language arts, math, science and social studies since economics is everywhere.  While many say economics is boring, most teachers introduced to great resources are very excited to go back and teach economics in their classroom.  Economics is practical and it definitely relates to the real world.  Students will instinctively recognize the relationship when teachers bring them engaging lessons.

Schools and teachers will also find that teaching economics can also be easy on the ol’ budget.  Free educational resources and professional development opportunities are readily available in most states, including Kansas.  The Kansas Council for Economic Education (KCEE) is here to help Kansas schools.  KCEE has partnered with the Foundation for Teaching Economics to bring Kansas teachers a special one-day training:

July 25Understanding Global Economic Issues – an event offered in partnership with the Foundation for Teaching Economics for 6th-12th grade teachers incorporating global economic concepts into classes.  Focus of program is on current global economic issues with a variety of lecture/discussion sessions and case studies/simulations adapted for classroom use.

  • FREE one day professional development event
  • Location – Lake Quivira Country Club, south of the Kansas Speedway off Hwy 435
  • $50 stipend if accepted by 10th
  • Optional: One hour graduate credit in economics from the University of Colorado Colorado Springs (approximately $122).  Assignment to be given during program seminar.

Why do people trade – across city lines, state lines, or national borders?  Are we better off with or without trade?  Will trade hurt or benefit certain groups of people?  How do some nations try to distort trade patterns?

These questions and many more are incorporated into the various lecture/discussion sessions and case studies that serve as the basis for the FTE One Day seminar on Understanding Global Economic Issues.

Presented in a non-biased manner, issues that face nations throughout the world will be explored and discussed.  Case studies and simulations may be adapted to variety of classes and disciplines.

The primary economics concepts emphasized throughout the sessions will be those related to the role of trade in raising standards of living and how policies can be developed to accomplish this goal.

Sessions will focus on current global trade patterns, trade alliances, impact of changes in exchange rates, and trade-offs that occur as trade patterns change over time.

REGISTER ONLINE:  http://bit.ly/UGEIapplication Seating is limited so apply ASAP.

4C_CEE_Horiz_CMYK

KCEE also offers other ways to help schools.  Webinars will be available in August for some programs and events.    Most states have a Council affiliated with the Council for Economic Education is a non-profit education organization with a great network of state Councils.

Register online or find out more about these workshop on the KCEE website at www.kcee.wichita.edu.  Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/KCEE1959.

Financial Literacy Month Offers A Chance To Have “The Talk” With Your Students

Angela headThis week’s contributor is Angela Howdeshell: I work as the Vice President for Programs and Administration for the Kansas Council for Economic Education, a non-profit organization housed at Wichita State University with a mission of helping Kansas K-12 schools integrate financial literacy and economic education.


FinLitMonth Image

While most of the United States is busy finishing up their last minute taxes or filing extensions, many are also taking advantage of this time to focus on K-12 financial literacy.  April has been declared Financial Literacy Month (#FinLitMonth) and many groups have been busy hosting Financial Literacy Month special events, developing new educational resources, and taking advantage of this month to advocate for increased support for financial literacy.  

Kansas is not alone in working to encourage youth to become more financially literate. The choices available to students today require them to be equipped with a strong understanding of economics and critical-thinking skills in order to increase their changes for a successful financial future.  Just one bad decision can catapult them into a life full of unplanned challenges that can stay with them for a lifetime.

Piggy Bank Econ-dancing

The Kansas State Department of Education is encouraging schools to offer more financial literacy so we can prepare our Kansas students for life after high school.  Not all parents are equipped to educate their children nor are they always great role models. Continue reading Financial Literacy Month Offers A Chance To Have “The Talk” With Your Students

Teaching Economics through the Lens of Sports

 

Angela head

Angela Howdeshell is the Vice President for Programs and Administration for the Kansas Council for Economic Education, a non-profit organization housed at Wichita State University with a mission of helping Kansas K-12 schools integrate financial literacy and economic education.


 

bobsled-team-run-olympics-38631.jpegAs a parent, I worked hard to find many different and creative ways to encourage my child to eat nutritious foods.  I would sneak it in whenever possible and sometimes in very creative ways.  There were times he noticed and then times he did not.  I hoped for more times where he did NOT notice.  Then I would struggle with the decision of whether or not I would tell him what he had just eaten.  Mostly, I chose to wait to tell him until much later down the road after he had eaten it several times.

kcee-logo

I know that I learned this game from my mother and father.  They were always trying to convince me that I could not survive on ravioli, burritos and pizza for every meal.  I refused to accept that terrible story that sounded like a big lie to me.  These foods seemed to have everything I thought I needed. Mom definitely tried in every way possible to force me to eat those red, green and orange things coming out of our massive garden, which she dedicated many hours tending to.  Outside of the strawberry patch, there were very few things I would consider trying.  Okay, maybe it had a little to do with a stubborn streak too.  My parents always hoped that I would have my own child that was as picky as I was.  They definitely got their wish!  My son could possibly be worse than I was.

One successful way that I remember my mother succeeding to change my eating plan was with her chocolate zucchini cake.  NEVER would I have touched a zucchini baked, fried, or any other way where it showed any skin, texture or taste of that very beneficial vegetable.  It would just be unacceptable in my books.  She succeeded this rare time and before I even knew it, I was chowing down that amazing cream cheese frosting and grabbing my second piece when she told me what was in the cake.  I had already admitted that I loved it so I had to embrace the fact that I lost the “hide the food” game that day.     Continue reading Teaching Economics through the Lens of Sports

2017 Kansas Social Studies Conference Kansans Can: Social Studies Leading the Way

ks ss conf logo

Be sure to mark your calendar and start making plans to attend the 2017 Kansas Social Studies Conference Kansans Can: Social Studies Leading the Way

Join us for a great time on November 5-6, 2017 in downtown Wichita at the historic Hotel at Old Town and Conference Center. You won’t want to miss it! Get the full details at the conference website.

The conference theme is focused on the teaching and learning of historical thinking skills and assessments with a special highlight on economics and the state board’s Kansans Can vision. You’ll walk away smarter with new details about the upcoming Spring 2018 social studies assessment, civic engagement strategies, tech integration tools, current best practice, and the latest from the Kansas Council for Economic Education.

Registration Fee:
$50 – Kansas Teachers/Administrators
$20 – Kansas Pre-service Teachers
$50 – Exhibitors

The registration fee also include hors d’oeuvres at the awards reception Sunday evening, breakfast Monday morning, and lunch Monday afternoon so don’t delay and register today!  We can send you an invoice to pay registration at a later date but reserve your hotel as soon as possible.

Extra bonus? The conference is in the center of Old Town with all sorts of fun things to do. We’ve also arranged for amazing prices at the Hotel at Old Town, a great piece of Wichita history.  Be sure to reserve your room before the October 12th cutoff date.  Don’t wait until the last minute as these rooms will go fast at this rate!  Contact the hotel directly to book your reservation. (You can request an invoice so the school can provide payment/check at check in.)

Room Rates:old hotel
Queen Studio – $79.00/night
King Studio – $89.00/night
Queen/Queen Studio – $99.00/night

Conference Schedule:

This conference will have great information for all grade levels, including special sessions for elementary teachers. Full details on the session schedule is coming in early October. (Interested in presenting?)

Sunday, November 5th:

3:00 – 6:15 p.m.
Afternoon workshops

6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Reception/awards ceremony with hors d’oeuvres and drinks

KSDE Update from Don Gifford

Untitled-1-02

7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Special screening of Dawn of Day, a historical documentary about the Underground Railroad in Kansas that brings to light Wabaunsee County’s unsung heroes who traversed one of the most turbulent times in our nation’s history. Faith, family, and politics united a community of neighbors who lived and died to ensure Kansas was a free state. Hang around after for conversation and teaching tips.

Monday November 6th

8:00 a.m.
Breakfast

Guest Speaker:  Mark Schug, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.
8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Breakout sessions

Lunch 

3:30 p.m.
Conference closing

Session Proposals:

We are currently soliciting session proposals so be sure to send us a proposal by September 20th if you have some great information to share with colleagues.  

Get more info and submit your proposal online

Your homework?

  • Save the date.
  • Talk to your admin.
  • Bookmark the website.
  • Submit a session proposal.
  • Share this information with your social studies colleagues.

Need more info? Contact:

Angela Howdeshell
Vice President for Programs & Administration
Kansas Council for Economic Education
kcee@wichita.edu
316-978-5183
www.kcee.wichita.edu

Economics is everywhere so it’s okay to teach in every class

Angela Howdehell works for the Kansas Council for Economic Education and is based at Wichita State University. She is today’s guest author.


kcee-logoI have been exhibiting at various annual teacher conferences in Kansas over the past fifteen years. Exhibits have included math, business, social studies, school administration, and much more. Countless times, a teacher has told me during a conversation, “I don’t teach economics. They teach that in the math department” or “They should be teaching that in Social Studies.”

Two minutes later, I’ll be speaking with a teacher instructing the same class at a different school and I hear something like “I love teaching economics in my world history class” or “I love bringing economics in my business class.” The longer I work with the Kansas Council for Economic Education, the more I understand why the idea of teaching economics might be confusing to some. Economics is everywhere, so it can and should be easily integrated into almost any K-12 subject. It is very practical and relates directly to the real world. Students get that! It’s a great thing that economic skills are also found in many of different content standards.

While sifting through old resources early on in my career, I found a reference page that would soon become one of my favorite documents. Our network refers to it as The Six Principles of Economic Thinking also know as The Handy Dandy Guide. This guide can be found in many of the resources provided through our national network of councils and centers for economic education.

For example, the Understanding Economics in U.S. History curriculum guide uses the six principles to help students gain a better understanding of events throughout history. Teachers can also find the guide referenced in the first lesson in our Financial Fitness for Life curriculum series.

Below are different versions of the poster for different grade levels: Continue reading Economics is everywhere so it’s okay to teach in every class